Quit Smoking Timeline

Quit Smoking Timeline

A timeline of benefits when you quit smoking

What Happens When You Quit Smoking?

Following through on your decision to quit smoking is hard. Especially in the beginning. But, if you can tough it out through those crucial first few days and weeks, your body and health will reward you later. You don’t have to wait long to start noticing (good) changes in your body. In fact, your health begins improving just 20 minutes after your last cigarette. Here’s what you can expect.

20 minutes after quitting

Your heart rate and blood pressure drop.

A few days after quitting

The carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal.

2 weeks to 3 months after quitting

Your circulation improves and your lung function increases.

1 to 12 months after quitting

Coughing and shortness of breath decrease. Tiny hair-like structures (called cilia) that move mucus out of the lungs start to regain normal function, increasing their ability to handle mucus, clean the lungs, and reduce the risk of infection.

1 to 2 years after quitting

Your risk of heart attack drops dramatically.

5 to 10 years after quitting

Your risk of cancers of the mouth, throat, and voice box (larynx) is cut in half. Your stroke risk decreases.

10 years after quitting

Your risk of lung cancer is about half that of a person who is still smoking (after 10 to 15 years). Your risk of cancer of the bladder, esophagus, and kidney decreases.

15 years after quitting

Your risk of coronary heart disease is close to that of a non-smoker.

via Cancer.org

Quit Smoking Timeline
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